Miller Center

Media Contact: Howard Witt, 434-924-6051

Miller Center National Fellowship Conference: Spring 2010

2010 Annual and Alumni Conferences

The University of Virginia's Miller Center of Public Affairs hosted the 2009-10 Miller Center National Fellowship Conference, on Thursday, May 6 & Friday, May 7 at the Miller Center in Charlottesville, Va. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Miller Center's influential National Fellowship Program, dozens of Fellows, many of whom now teach at leading universities across the country, returned to Charlottesville for the conference. Current Fellows shared the stage with their Dream Mentors, engaging the audience with their present research agenda. On Friday afternoon, May 7, editors from leading academic presses and journalists from major media outlets discussed strategies for getting scholarly work published in various mediums for public consumption--from books and journals to newspapers and television to blogs and social media.

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Expanding Rights Domestically and Abroad


Vesla Weaver

Vesla Weaver is an Assistant Professor in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics. She received her doctorate from Harvard University in the joint programs of Government and Social Policy. Weaver has written on topics including race and ethnic politics, immigration, social policy, electoral politics, political psychology, American political development, and the politics of inequality. She is currently completing a book manuscript, Frontlash: Race and the Transformation of American Criminal Policy and Politics, which uncovers a connection between the movement for civil rights and the development of punitive criminal justice.

Ensuring America's Health: Publicly Constructing the Private Health Insurance Industry, 1945-1970


Christy Chapin

Christy Chapin is a Ph.D. candidate in the Corcoran Department of history at the University of Virginia, working with Associate Professor and GAGE Chair, Brian Balogh. She received her B.A. from the College of William and Mary in 1996. She has served as a graduate teaching assistant for a diverse array of courses at the University of Virginia, including The History of the Civil Rights Movement; Viewing America: American History since 1945; and Shaping the Modern World, 1900-1946. Chapin received the Bankard Fellowship in Political Economy in 2008.


Deborah Stone

Deborah Stone is visiting and research professor in the Department of Government and the Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth College. She earned her Ph.D. in Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Stone has also served as the David R. Pokross Professor of Law and Social Policy at Brandeis University from 1986 to 1999, and has taught in the undergraduate and graduate programs at MIT, Yale, Tulane, and Duke University.


Vanessa Walker

Ambivalent Allies: Advocates, Diplomats, and the Struggle for an "American" Human Rights Policy

Vanessa Walker is a Ph.D. candidate working with Professor Jeremi Suri at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her B.A. from Whitman College in 2000 and received her M.A. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2004. Walker's publications include "At the End of Influence: Rethinking Human Rights and Intervention in U.S.-Latin American Relations," which will be published by the Journal of Contemporary History later this year, and "Jimmy Carter and the Foreign Policy of Human Rights," Diplomatic History (January 2004), co-authored with David F. Schmitz.


Jana Lipman

Jana Lipman is an assistant professor of history at Tulane University. She is a specialist on 20th-century U.S. history, especially foreign relations, social and political history, Cuba and Vietnam. Lipman is interested in US foreign relations broadly construed to include diplomatic and non-state actors. Her recent work on the US naval base in Guantanamo Bay (GTMO) reorients the field of foreign relations and demonstrates how neocolonialism, empire, and revolution functioned in working people's lives.

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Parties, Regimes, and Public Policy


Jeff Jenkins

Jeffery A. Jenkins is Associate Professor in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia and Faculty Associate in the GAGE program at the Miller Center. Jenkins works at the intersection of mainstream American Politics and American political history, with research focusing on the origins and development of American political institutions, notably congressional and partisan institutions, as well as the use of historical data to test contemporary theories of legislative organization and behavior. He is a current editorial board member of Congress & the Presidency, and was previously an editorial board member of Legislative Studies Quarterly (2005-2007).

Progressive & Traditional Family Orders: Parties, Ideologies, and the Development of Social Policy across the 20th Century


Gwen Alphonso

Gwen Alphonso is a Ph.D. candidate working with Professor Richard Bensel in the Department of Government at Cornell University. She received a Doctor of Science of Law (JSD) from Cornell University in 2006 and a Bachelor of Civil Laws in European and Comparative Law (BCL) from Oxford University in 2000. She earned her B.A. from the National Law School of India University in 1999. Alphonso has served as a research workshop facilitator in family law at the Kahn Liberal Arts Institute at Smith College and as an adjunct lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice Studies at Ithaca College.


Adam Sheingate

Adam Sheingate is associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. He has also held fellowships at Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his doctorate in political science at Yale. Sheingate's specialties are American politics and comparative public policy. His first book, The Rise of the Agricultural Welfare State: Institutions and Interest Group Power in the United States, France, and Japan (Princeton University Press, 2001) was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association.

Don't Blame Us: Grassroots Liberalism in Massachusetts, 1960-1990


Lily Geismer

Lily Geismer is a History Ph.D. candidate currently working with Professor Matt Lassiter at the University of Michigan. She received her B.A. from Brown University in 2003. She has served as a graduate student instructor in History of the Family in the United States, United States History Since 1945, and History of American Suburbia. Geismer recently accepted a tenure-track assistant professorship in United States History since 1945 at Claremont McKenna College.


Nancy MacLean

Nancy MacLean is professor of History and African American Studies, Chair of the Department of History, and Faculty Associate of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. She earned her Ph.D. in U.S. History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She specializes in the history of social movements and public policy, with expertise in African-American, women's and labor history. Her current research focuses on the modern women's movement, conservative movement, and the origins of school vouchers. She has written Freedom is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard University Press, 2006) and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (Oxford University Press, 1994).

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A Panel Discussion of U.Va. Politics Professor Sid Milkis's New Book

Theodore Roosevelt, the Progressive Party, and the Transformation of American Democracy (University Press of Kansas, September 2009)


Brian Balogh

Brian Balogh is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia and Director of the GAGE National Fellowship Program. Before coming to U.Va., Brian Balogh taught history at Harvard University. Trained as a historian at The Johns Hopkins University, his specialties are 20th century American history, political history, American Political Development, history of science and technology, and environmental history. Professor Balogh is co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys, a call-in radio show. Professor Balogh is the author of A Government Out of Sight: The Mystery of National Authority in Nineteenth Century America (Cambridge University Press, spring 2009) and Chain Reaction: Expert Debate and Public Participation in American Commercial Nuclear Power, 1945-1975 (Cambridge University Press, 1991) and he edited Integrating the Sixties: The Origins, Structures and Legitimacy of Public Policy in a Turbulent Decade (Pennsylvania University Press, 1996).




Saladin Ambar

Saladin Ambar is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Africana Studies at Lehigh University. His research interests include American politics, the presidency and executive politics, racial and ethnic politics, and American political thought. Ambar is currently researching and writing, The Hidden Prince: Governors, Executive Power, and the Rise of the Modern Presidency. Ambar received his Ph.D. from Rutgers University.


Nicole Mellow

Nicole Mellow is Associate Professor of Political Science at Williams College. Mellow specializes in American political development and political institutions, and her current research focuses on the regional sources of modern partisanship. Mellow is the author of The State of Disunion (Johns Hopkins University, 2008), which chronicles 20th century American political regionalism and partisanship. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.


Sid Milkis

Sid Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics and Assistant Director for Academic Programs at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. His research focuses on the American presidency, political parties and elections, social movements and American political development. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate students, he regularly gives public lectures on American politics and participates in programs for international scholars and high school teachers that probe the deep historical roots of contemporary developments in the United States. Professor Milkis has published a number of books including, Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) and The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (Oxford University Press, 1993).


Stephen Skowronek

Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and has held the Chair in American Civilization at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. His research concerns American national institutions and American political history. His publications include Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, 1877-1920 (Cambridge University Press, 1982), The Politics Presidents Make: Leadership from John Adams to Bill Clinton (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1997), The Search for American Political Development (Cambridge, 2004, with Karen Orren), and Presidential Leadership in Political Time: Reprise and Reappraisal (University Press of Kansas, 2008).

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The Ideological and Behavioral Context of Foreign Policy Strategy


Jeff Legro

Jeff Legro is Compton Professor of World Politics and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. He is a Faculty Associate in the Governing America in a Global Era Program at the Miller Center of Public Affairs. A specialist on international relations, Legro has served as a consultant to foundations, think tanks, publishers, and government agencies. He is currently the chair of an American Political Science Association Task Force on U.S. standing in the world. Legro is co-editor, with fellow GAGE Faculty Associate Melvyn P. Leffler, of To Lead the World: American Strategy After the Bush Doctrine (2008); the author of Rethinking the World: Great Power Strategies and International Order (2005) and Cooperation under Fire: Anglo-German Restraint during World War II (1995); and a contributor to The Culture of National Security (1996).



Two Concepts of Liberty: American Grand Strategy and the Liberal Tradition


Brendan Green

Brendan Green is a Ph.D. candidate working with Professor Barry Posen at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his A.B. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 2003. Green co-edited U.S. Military Innovation after the Cold War: Creation without Destruction, published by Routledge in April of 2009, and also co-authored several chapters in the book.


James McAllister

James McAllister is associate professor and chair of the Leadership Studies Program at Williams College, as well as Gaudino Scholar for 2004-06. He earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has written No Exit: America and the German Problem 1943-1954 (Cornell University Press, 2002). McAllister's primary interests include American foreign policy, the Cold War, and European politics. He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants, including the Oakley Fellowship (Williams College Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences), the Lyndon Baines Johnson Travel Grant, the John Olin Fellowship, and the Columbia University President's Fellowship.

Planning in the Shadow of the Future: U.S. Military Interventions and Time Horizons


Aaron Rapport

Aaron Rapport is a Ph.D. candidate currently working with 2001 Miller Center Fellow Ronald Krebs at the University of Minnesota. He received his B.A. from Northwestern University in 2003. He has served as a teaching assistant in American Democracy in a Changing World, Racial Attitudes and Intergroup Relations, and United States Foreign Policy. He has also published "Unexpected Affinities? Neoconservatism's Place in IR Theory" in Security Studies (2008). His main areas of concentration are international relations, American politics, political psychology, and political methodology.


Jack Levy

Jack Levy is Board of Governors' Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, and Senior Associate at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. He is past president of the International Studies Association (2007-08) and of the Peace Science Society (2005-06). He has previously held tenured positions at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Minnesota, and visiting or adjunct positions at Tulane, Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, and NYU. Levy received APSA's Helen Dwight Reid Award (1977) for the best dissertation in International Relations in 1975-76, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Foreign Policy Analysis Section of the International Studies Association (2000). His research focuses primarily on the causes of war, foreign policy decision-making, and qualitative methodology.

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Financing War and Warring With Finance


Mel Leffler

Mel Leffler, Faculty Associate in the Governing America in a Global Era Program, is Edward R. Stettinius professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia. He served as the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at U.Va. from 1997-2001. In 1993 he won the Bancroft Prize for A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration and the Cold War (1992) and, in 2008, won the George Louis Beer Prize for his book, For the Soul of Mankind: the United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War (Hill & Wang, 2007). His other books include: Specter of Communism: The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1917-1953 (1994); The Elusive Quest: America's Pursuit of European Stability and French Security, 1919-1933 (1979); and most recently, To Lead the World: American Strategy After the Bush Doctrine (Oxford, 2008), co-edited with GAGE Associate Jeff Legro.



The Life and Death of the Hydra-Headed Monster: Antebellum Bank Regulation and American State Development, 1781-1836


Eric Lomazoff

Eric Lomazoff is a Ph.D. candidate in Government at Harvard University, working with Freed Professor of Government Dan Carpenter. Lomazoff received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2001. He has served as a teaching fellow in a senior thesis writer's workshop in American politics, American Government, and Constitutional Democracy in America at Harvard University. He has also served as the head teaching fellow in The Theory and Practice of Republican Government and American Constitutional Law.


Stephen Skowronek

Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and has held the Chair in American Civilization at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. His research concerns American national institutions and American political history. His publications include Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, 1877-1920 (Cambridge University Press, 1982), The Politics Presidents Make: Leadership from John Adams to Bill Clinton (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1997), The Search for American Political Development (Cambridge, 2004, with Karen Orren), and Presidential Leadership in Political Time: Reprise and Reappraisal (University Press of Kansas, 2008).

Finance at War: Debt, Borrowing, and Conflict


Zane Kelly

Zane Kelly is a Political Science Ph.D. candidate at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He received his B.A. from the University of Washington, Seattle in 2003. He has served as a graduate part-time instructor, teaching courses on strategic defense, global development, and American foreign policy. His areas of specialization include international relations, comparative politics, and political methodology.


Erik Gartzke

Erik Gartzke is associate professor of Political Science at the University of California at San Diego. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Iowa. He studies the impact of information on war, peace and international institutions. Gartzke's research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Politics and elsewhere. He is currently working on two books--one on globalization and the other on the democratic peace.

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Within the Academy: Traditional Scholarly Outlets


Sid Milkis

Sid Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics and Assistant Director for Academic Programs at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. His research focuses on the American presidency, political parties and elections, social movements and American political development. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate students, he regularly gives public lectures on American politics and participates in programs for international scholars and high school teachers that probe the deep historical roots of contemporary developments in the United States. Professor Milkis has published a number of books including, Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) and The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (Oxford University Press, 1993).


Susan Ferber

Susan Ferber is Executive Editor for American and World History at Oxford University Press-USA, where she has worked since 1997. Her diverse list of academic and trade books ranges from ancient history to contemporary history, including titles on US political history and foreign relations. She has edited many first books, as well as the work of senior scholars. Books she has edited have won numerous prizes, including a Pulitzer Prize in History and the Bancroft Prize, and one became an international bestseller.


Michael McGandy

Michael McGandy is acquisitions editor at Cornell University Press. His career in publishing began in 2000, and he has been an editor at Macmillan Library Reference/Gale Group, W. W. Norton, and Rowman and Littlefield. At Cornell University Press, where he has been since 2008, he acquires and develops books in the fields of American history, politics, and urban studies with a special focus on political history and political development.


Nicole Hemmer

Nicole Hemmer is Lecturer of History, Manchester College. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2009. Her research interests include 19th and 20th-Century U.S. History and she has served as a teaching fellow for several courses at Columbia University including American Urban History, American Radical Tradition, and Politics of the American Environment.

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Beyond the Ivory Tower and Into the Blogosphere: Media Outlets that Reach a Broad Public


Brian Balogh

Brian Balogh is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia and Director of the GAGE National Fellowship Program. Before coming to U.Va., Brian Balogh taught history at Harvard University. Trained as a historian at The Johns Hopkins University, his specialties are 20th century American history, political history, American Political Development, history of science and technology, and environmental history. Professor Balogh is co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys, a call-in radio show. Professor Balogh is the author of A Government Out of Sight: The Mystery of National Authority in Nineteenth Century America (Cambridge University Press, spring 2009) and Chain Reaction: Expert Debate and Public Participation in American Commercial Nuclear Power, 1945-1975 (Cambridge University Press, 1991) and he edited Integrating the Sixties: The Origins, Structures and Legitimacy of Public Policy in a Turbulent Decade (Pennsylvania University Press, 1996).


Christina Bellantoni

Christina Bellantoni is senior reporter for Talking Points Memo, covering the White House and politics, a post she took in October 2009. Before joining the TPM staff, Bellantoni was with the Washington Times for six years where she covered state and Congressional politics. She transitioned to the national political beat as a White House correspondent and covered the 2008 Democratic presidential campaigns.


John Dickerson

John Dickerson is Slate magazine's Chief Political Correspondent and a political analyst for CBS News. He is also author of On Her Trail, a Simon and Schuster book about his mother, the late Nancy Dickerson, a pioneering newswoman. Prior to joining Slate, Dickerson covered politics for 12 years for TIME magazine. His last four years he was the magazine's White House correspondent.


Jonathan Martin

Jonathan Martin is a Senior Political Writer for Politico. Martin came to Politico from National Review, where he wrote about politics for the magazine and the Web site. Prior to that, he worked for The Hotline covering topics ranging from gubernatorial contests to congressional leadership battles.


Bill Schneider

Bill Schneider currently serves as CNN's senior political analyst and Distinguished Senior Fellow & Resident Scholar at Third Way, a Washington think tank. Schneider is also the Omer L. and Nancy Hirst Professor at George Mason University's School of Public Policy. Schneider has been labeled "the nation's electionmeister" by the Washington Times and "the Aristotle of American politics" by the Boston Globe. Campaigns and Elections magazine called him "the most consistently intelligent analyst on television." Schneider has been named one of the 50 most influential Washington journalists by Washingtonian Magazine.