Miller Center

Georgia Historical Society

CPC Catalog > Organization: Georgia Historical Society

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Georgia Historical Society

501 Whitaker Street

Savannah, GA 31401

http://georgiahistory.com/

Description:

Located in historic Hodgson Hall, the Research Center preserves an unparalleled collection of Georgia history, including more than 4 million manuscripts, 100,000 photographs, 30,000 architectural drawings, 15,000 rare and non-rare books, and thousands of maps, portraits, and artifacts.  The Georgia Historical Society’s vast collection includes such treasures as an original draft of the U.S. Constitution, one of only a handful in existence; a compass and snuff box belonging to Georgia founder James Oglethorpe; records related to the Cherokee Removal and Trail of Tears of 1836; and the correspondence of national figures such as U.S. presidents Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, Confederate General Robert E. Lee, and Girl Scout founder Juliette Gordon Low. 

You can explore their digital finding aids at http://ghs.galileo.usg.edu/ghs/search.

Categories: Andrew Johnson,

Collections:
Hugh L. Dennard pardon and loyalty oath, 1865-1867
Harvey Magee Watterson letter, 1865
William Jones pardon, 1865
George Nowlan Saussy Letters, 1864-1909
Pleasant Alexander Stovall Papers, 1846-1974

Note that this is an incomplete collections list. Please contact the organization directly for the most current information about their holdings.


Hugh L. Dennard pardon and loyalty oath, 1865-1867

2 oversize folders (.09 cubic feet)
Collection is open for research.
This collection contains an official presidential pardon dated 29 May 1865 to Hugh L. Dennard of Houston County, Georgia from President Andrew Johnson and a loyalty oath dated 5 February 1867 sent from Dennard to Secretary of State William H. Seward.
[item identification], Hugh L. Dennard pardon and loyalty oath, MS 1999, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia.
Copyright has been assigned to the Georgia Historical Society. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Division of Library and Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Georgia Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and as the owner of copyright in items created by the donor. Although copyright was transferred by the donor, copyright in some items in the collection may still be held by their respective creator(s). For further information contact the Division of Library and Archives.
Andrew Johnson became president shortly after Lincoln's assassination. He intended on following through with Reconstruction with the same lenient policies that Lincoln had established prior to his death. It was originally intended by Lincoln that all willing to take an oath of allegiance would be pardoned. President Johnson held to this, but required that all men of wealth and leadership apply for a special Personal Pardon from the President, himself. On 29 May, 1865, Johnson issued a General Amnesty, pardoning all Confederate State citizens that had not been pardoned in the previous years of Lincoln's Reconstruction. With this, a letter of acceptance was required to be mailed back from the recipient of the pardon. Because this General Amnesty did not pertain to men of wealth and leadership, over half of the applications for the Personal Pardon came shortly thereafter. Surprisingly, most pardons dating from 1865 to 1867 were not to soldiers of the Confederacy, but to those who supported the Confederate cause. Finally, on Christmas of 1868, President Johnson made an Unconditional Amnesty for all Confederates. Due to the dates on the pardon and oath, it is understood that Hugh L. Dennard received a General Amnesty. He sent his letter of confirmation and acceptance to Johnson's Secretary of State William Seward on 5 February, 1867. Dennard lived in Perry, Houston County, Georgia in the 1860s and because he qualified for the General Amnesty, he would have owned less than $20,000 worth of land. Hugh L. Dennard was born circa 1800 and died in the 1880s. He was married to Frances Sarah Crocker and had three children: Ervin Dennard, Josephine Dennard, and Mary Frances Dennard. Mary Frances went on to marry the future U.S. Congressman, Dudley Mays Hughes.
Collection materials are in English.
Finding aid is available in repository.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/496023942

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- Andrew Johnson

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Harvey Magee Watterson letter, 1865

1 folder (.05 cubic feet)
Collection is open for research.
This collection consists of an 1865 letter from Harvey Magee Watterson to President Andrew Johnson, sent from Milledgeville, Georgia. In the letter, Watterson sends a copy of Dispatch No. 10, mentions fine pictures of Georgia and the South, and praises Generals Steadman and Tillson, as well as Governor James Johnson. He quotes a communication from Herschel V. Johnson regarding conditions in Georgia and recommends the removal of Federal troops and the re-establishment of civil authority. Two pages of the letter are missing and the edges appear singed.
[item identification], Harvey Magee Watterson letter, MS 842, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia.
Copyright has not been assigned to the Georgia Historical Society. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Division of Library and Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Georgia Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.
Colonial Dames of America, Georgia Society historical collection, MS 965.
Harvey Magee Watterson (1811-1891), representative from Tennessee, was born at "Beechgrove" in Bedford County, Tennessee. He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Shelbyville, Tennessee. He also edited a newspaper there. He was a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives and Speaker of the Tennessee Senate. President Zachary Taylor sent Watterson on a diplomatic mission to Buenos Aires in 1847. In 1860, Watterson was a presidential elector. He moved to Washington, D.C. and practiced law there for 14 years. He then moved to Louisville, Kentucky, and was on the editorial staff of the Louisville Courier-Journal.
Collection materials are in English.
Finding aid is available in repository.
 

Size
1 folder

Presidential content includes:

- Andrew Johnson

[ TOP ↑ ]

William Jones pardon, 1865

1 folder (.05 cubic feet)
Collection is open for research.
This collection consists of a pardon for William Jones of Columbia County, Georgia, August 21, 1865, stamped with President Andrew Johnson's signature. Jones' Amnesty Oath, dated December 5, 1865, is pasted into the pardon.
[item identification], William Jones pardon, MS 449, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia.
Copyright has not been assigned to the Georgia Historical Society. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Division of Library and Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Georgia Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.
Cohen-Phillips papers, MS 162.
William Neyle Habersham papers, MS 347.
Isham Keith papers, MS 455.
King and Wilder families papers, MS 465.
James Wallace McAlpin papers, MS 513.
Saussy family papers, MS 1276.
Wayne-Stites-Anderson papers, MS 846.
After the end of the Civil war and the assassination of President Lincoln, President Andrew Johnson offered most Confederate soldiers the chance for pardon in exchange for their allegiance to the United States. This pardon allowed all those who swore loyalty oaths to vote and hold office. Many Confederate veterans sought a pardon in part to protect their lands from confiscation by the government. William Jones was a planter in Columbia County, Georgia.
Collection materials are in English.
Finding aid is available in repository.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/85845118

Size
1 folder

Presidential content includes:

- Andrew Johnson

[ TOP ↑ ]

George Nowlan Saussy Letters, 1864-1909

Saussy, George Nowlan, 1842-1916. George Nowlan Saussy (1842-1916) was born in Savannah, Georgia. As a young man, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, becoming a soldier of the Jeff Davis Legion (Troop F of General J.E.B. Stuart's brigade). He was wounded twice, captured, and paroled after the end of the Civil War. Returning to Savannah, Saussy worked in the transportation service until 1912, when he was selected as superintendent of the Georgia Confederate Home in Atlanta. On January 1, 1914, he became the executive officer of the Florida Confederate Home in Jacksonville, a post he held until his death.

This collection consists of letters written to Gordon Nowlan Saussy. Included are letters from George Washington Custis Lee to Saussy concerning Dungeness, the Nathanael Green-Nightingale home on Cumberland Island; a letter from Jefferson Davis relaying his pride that the Jefferson Davis Legion bore his name; letters from Grover Cleveland and Jefferson Davis thanking Saussy for some oranges; a letter from Varina Davis (Jefferson Davis' wife) thanking him for pines and stating that Mr. Davis is not well; and a letter from Varina Davis, 1882, sharing condolences on the death of his child.

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/157010745

Size
0.5 cubic feet

Presidential content includes:

- Grover Cleveland

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Pleasant Alexander Stovall Papers, 1846-1974

Stovall, Pleasant A., 1857-1935. Pleasant Alexander Stovall (1857-1935) was born in Augusta, Georgia. He attended a private boy's school in Augusta, where Woodrow Wilson was a classmate. In 1885, Stovall married Mary Ganahl also of Augusta. They moved to Savannah in 1891 where Stovall and David Robinson established the Savannah Press. Stovall represented Chatham County in the Georgia General Assembly from 1902 until 1906 and again 1912-1913. In June, 1913, President Woodrow Wilson appointed Stoval as minister to Switzerland, a post he held until May, 1920, when he reigned to return to his editorial work and political activities. He was the author of Robert Toombs, Statesman, Speaker, Sage (1892), Switzerland and the World War (1939), and a collection of impressions written while he was minister to Switzerland and published after his death.

This collection consists of correspondence, printed materials, speeches, business and legal papers, photographs, newspaper clippings, diplomatic papers, genealogical data, and scrapbooks. The collection contains papers re American Embassy in Switzerland, an unsigned, undated will of Pleasant A. Stovall, a purchase agreement for six city lots and portion of a seventh in Harden Ward, Savannah, a program from a testimonial supper to George M. Tiedman, a broadside on the laying of the corner stones of Greene and Pulaski monuments, 1825, Stovall's membership certificate as a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and a list of trustees of the Georgia Infirmary. Correspondents include: President Benjamin Harrison; General William T. Sherman; Justice O.W. Holmes; President Grover Cleveland; President Theodore Roosevelt; President William McKinley; Mills B. Lane; A.R. Lawton; Juliette Low; Hoke Smith; Woodrow Wilson; William H. Taft; A.A. Lawrence; John D. Rockefeller, Jr.; and Franklin D. Roosevelt. The collection also includes Sarah Adams Bulkley's will and memoriams to Bulkley, who was lost at sea. She was Mary Stovall's (Pleasant Stovall's wife) aunt. In addition, the diary of Rev. A.E. Wilson which he sent to his daughter, Martha Smithey Wilson, is in the collection. The diary describes Wilson's travels and sites in Africa where he served as a missionary. Also included is part of a speech and "The Tragedy of Mosega," by Edyth Kaigh-Eustace (2 copies) which recounts the death of Mrs. A.E. Wilson in Africa. Martha Smithey Wilson Stovall became the mother of Pleasant Alexander Stovall.
[Item identification], Pleasant Alexander Stovall papers, MS 1021, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia.
Copyright has not been assigned to the Georgia Historical Society. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Division of Library and Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Georgia Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.
 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/157010795

Size
1.5 cubic feet

Presidential content includes:

- Grover Cleveland

- Benjamin Harrison

- Theodore Roosevelt

- Woodrow Wilson

- William McKinley

- Franklin D. Roosevelt

- William Taft

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