Miller Center

Smithsonian Institution - Archives of American Art

CPC Catalog > Organization: Smithsonian Institution - Archives of American Art

Location [ map ]

Archives of American Art,
Smithsonian Institution
P.O. Box 37012
Victor Building, Suite 2200, MRC 937
Washington, DC 20013-7012

Description:

Founded in Detroit in 1954 by Edgar P. Richardson, then Director of the Detroit Institute of Arts, and Lawrence A. Fleischman, a Detroit executive and active young collector, the initial goal of the Archives was to serve as microfilm repository of papers housed in other institutions. This mission expanded quickly to collecting and preserving original material and, in 1970, the Archives joined the Smithsonian Institution, sharing the Institution’s mandate—the increase and diffusion of knowledge.

The Archives today is the world’s pre-eminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America.

Our vast holdings—more than 20 million letters, diaries and scrapbooks of artists, dealers, and collectors; manuscripts of critics and scholars; business and financial records of museums, galleries, schools, and associations; photographs of art world figures and events; sketches and sketchbooks; rare printed material; film, audio and video recordings; and the largest collection of oral histories anywhere on the subject of art—are a vital resource to anyone interested in American culture over the past 200 years.

Yet the Archives is still growing! Each year, our curators travel the country seeking the papers of today’s artists, dealers, and collectors, and once new collections are acquired, professional archivists preserve the materials and create easy-to-use guides.

Founded on the belief that the public needs free and open access to the most valuable research materials, our collections are available to the thousands of researchers who consult original papers at our research facilities or use our reference services remotely every year, and to millions who visit us online to access detailed images of fully digitized collections.

Our resources serve as reference for countless dissertations, exhibitions, catalogues, articles, and books on American art and artists, and preserve the untold stories that, without a central repository such as the Archives, might have otherwise been lost.

Through collecting, preserving, and providing access to our collections, the Archives inspires new ways of interpreting the visual arts in America and allows current and future generations to piece together the nation’s rich artistic and cultural heritage.

Categories:

Collections:
Berryman Family Papers, 1829-1984
Martin Birnbaum Papers, 1862-1970
Albert Rosenthal Papers, 1860-1940

Note that this is an incomplete collections list. Please contact the organization directly for the most current information about their holdings.


Berryman Family Papers, 1829-1984

Berryman family papers, 1829-1984. Biographical material, diaries, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, art work, scrapbooks, photographs and printed material primarily documenting the careers of Washington Star cartoonist Clifford Berryman, and his daughter, Star art critic Florence Berryman; Jim Berryman's career is not as well represented. Political cartoonists and art critic; Washington, D.C. Clifford became a cartoonist for the Washington Post in 1891 and from 1897-1949 worked for the Washington Star, winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1944. His cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt, "Drawing the Line in Mississippi," 1902 began the Teddy Bear craze and created Berryman's cartoon trademark. He was the first cartoonist to become president of the Gridiron Club. His wife, Kate, was active in the Daughters of the American Revolution. Their daughter, Florence, served as an editor for the American Federation of Arts until 1944, when she joined the Star as assistant to art critic Leila Mechlin. In 1946 she became critic upon Mechlin's retirement, and remained there until 1961. Her brother, Jim, became a Star cartoonist in 1931 and during his career also won a Pulitzer Prize for his political cartoons.

Among the correspondence in Clifford's papers are a letter, 1829, from Henry Clay to Mark Hardin, and a letter of introduction, 1917, for Will Rogers. Other correspondents include William Jennings Bryan, Harry Flood Byrd, Calvin Coolidge, Josephus Daniels, Jay Norwood Darling, Eugene Debs, Gilbert Grosvenor, Warren G. Harding, Will H. Hays, Herbert Hoover, J. Edgar Hoover, John T. McCutcheon, Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, Harry S. Truman, and Woodrow Wilson.

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/888081132

Size
11.3 linear feet

Presidential content includes:

- Calvin Coolidge

- Warren G. Harding

- Herbert Hoover

- Theodore Roosevelt

- William Taft

- Harry S. Truman

- Woodrow Wilson

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Martin Birnbaum Papers, 1862-1970

Birnbaum, Martin, 1878-1970. Art dealer, New York, N.Y. Manager of the Berlin Photographic Co., New York City, 1910-1916. Longtime partner in the art firm of Scott & Fowles. Spent later part of his career building the Grenville Lindall Winthrop Collection, now at the Fogg Museum. Correspondence; business materials; legal documents; writings; printed material; notebook; photographs and tape recordings. REELS N698, N698A, and N698B: Correspondence primarily reflecting his association with the firm of Scott & Fowles, but also including details about lives and activities of his correspondents, among them Edward Bruce, Grover Cleveland, Norman Douglas, Rockwell Kent, Paul Manship, Upton Sinclair, Maxfield Parrish, Bernard Berenson, Augustus E. John, Jules Pascin, Carl Van Vechten, Hamilton Easter Field, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Gari Melchers, William Hunt Diederich, Elie Nadelman, Childe Hassam, John Quinn, Charles Ricketts, Nicholas K. Roerich, and Charles H. Shannon. REEL 108: Primarily letters received by Birnbaum in New York, and throughout Europe from 1917-1943. Correspondents include Grenville L. Winthrop, Gisela Richter, Stevenson Scott, Paul Manship, Maurice Sterne, Edward Bruce, and Maxfield Parrish, Upton Sinclair, George Bellows, John Gregory, Augustus John, Ivan Mestrovic, Elizabeth Winthrop Miles, Robert McIntyre, Georgia O'Keeffe, Joseph Pennell, John Quinn, Charles Ricketts, William Rothenstein, Albert Rutherston, Pamela Colman Smith, Carl Sprinchorn, Pavel Tchelitchew, Schofield Thayer, T. Zoumpoulakis, and family members. Subject matter includes business concerns, art concerns, travel, and family affairs. REELS 1023-1025: Over 1600 letters received. Correspondents include: Cecelia Beaux, Sven Berg, Gutzon Borglum, Edward Bruce, Lodewyk Bruckman, Beniamino Bufano, Mabel Choate, Stephen C. Clark, Royal Cortissoz, Walter Damrosch, Edmund Davis, Reginald Davis, Louise Dillingham, Edmund Dulac, Anne Goldthwaite, Magnus Gross, Herbert Haseltine, Malvina Hoffman, Jan Hoowij, Benjamin Javits, Rockwell Kent, Lenard Kester, Paul Manship, Elisabeth Marbury, Henry McIlhenny, Gari Melchers, Houghton P. Metcalf, Emily Winthrop Miles, Kate Morse, Georgia O'Keeffe, James Parmelee, Maxfield Parrish, Harold Woodbury Parsons, Jules Pascin, Albin Polasek, Alfred B. Potterton, Edward G. Robinson, J. F. Rock, John D. Rockefeller, Emanuel G. Romano, John Rothenstein, John Singer Sargent, Stevenson Scott, Janet Scudder, Carl Sprinchorn, Maurice Sterne, Albert Sterner, R.A. Walker (Georges Derry), Elsie Weil, Carl N. Werntz, Millicent Werntz, Edith Wetmore, Thornton Wilder, llis Wilson, Stanley Wilson, Grenville Lindall Winthrop, and Carl Zigrosser. REELS 1025-1026: Business and financial documents; legal documents, certificates, and passports; writings by Birnbaum and others including a manuscript for Birnbaum's book The Last Romantic, with notes by Upton Sinclair; one scrapbook of clippings, loose clippings regarding Edward Dulac, and other printed material; sketches; bookplates; notes, letters, and printed material relating to Aubrey Beardsley; lists and descriptions of works of art; a notebook of addresses; travel itineraries and maps; and programs. REEL 1027: 287 photographs of Birnbaum, and art related people, including Maurice Sterne, Edward Bruce, Leo Stein and Alfred Potterton at Anticoli Corrado, and Cecilia Beaux, Robert Chanler, Philip de Laszlo, Despiau, Norman Douglas, Lord Duveen, Herbert Haseltine, Augustus John by Arnold Genthe, Paul Manship by De Witt Ward, Gari Melchers, Elie Nadelman, Mrs. Gustave Radeke, William Rothenstein, Stevenson Scott, Clare Sheridan, Albert Sterner, Abraham Walkowitz, Mrs. Leonard Volkman Webb, and Grenville Lindall Winthrop; 82 travel photographs primarily of Greece; and 142 photographs of works of art.

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/888072490

Size
4.3 linear feet

Presidential content includes:

- Grover Cleveland

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Albert Rosenthal Papers, 1860-1940

Rosenthal, Albert, 1863-1939. Albert Rosenthal (1863-1939) was a portrait painter, printmaker, writer, and collector in Philadelphia, Pa. Rosenthal was a student of his father, engraver Max Rosenthal, and later published a book about him. He is also known for his portraits of Supreme Court Justices, and his collection of American drawings, which he donated to the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1927.

Correspondence, printed material, and photographs relating to Rosenthal's work, primarily as a portrait painter and collector of American art and artists' papers. Some material pertains to Rosenthal's father, the engraver Max Rosenthal. Included are: biographical notes and articles by and about Rosenthal and his father, Max; writings by Albert about his father; and reproductions of Albert's work.
Rosenthal's research material on early American art consists of articles on artists, notes about portrait painters, typescript copies of letters of or about early American artists, among them Rembrandt Peale, G.P.A. Healy, and John Rampage, several original letters, including 5 from John Quincy Adams Ward to various people, and one from Ben Silliman to Asher B. Durand, and an engraved copy of a letter from Ben Franklin to Mr. Strahan, July 5, 1775. Other material includes files on Rosenthal's portraits of French officers who served in the American Revolution; Gilbert Stuart's (George) Washington portraits, 1922-1923; the Rodin Museum in Philadelphia (includes correspondence with Jules Mastbaum, the founder of the museum, and others, 1925-1932); Jean Antoine Houdon's busts of Washington and Lafayette, 1925-1932; Harry T. Peters' book "America on Stone", 1931; and on "Rosen-Thal," Albert's home that was originally the Huffinagle mansion in Buck's County, Pa.
There is voluminous business and other correspondence, 1860-1940, relating to Max, Louis, and Albert Rosenthal's work and to Albert's portraits of Supreme Court Justices. Among the diverse group of correspondents are: Samuel Putnam Avery, William Hunt Diederich, Charles Henry Hart, Sakakichi Hartmann, Oliver Wendell Holmes, A. Mitchell Palmer, Alfred Stieglitz, William Howard Taft, and J. Alden Weir. Photographs are of Rosenthal's work and of unidentified portraits possibly by Rosenthal; reproductions of European paintings, miniatures, sculptures; and miscellaneous portraits by various artists. Unmicrofilmed material (0.4 feet) consists of miscellaneous photographs and reproductions.

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/888070761

Size
2.4 linear ft

Presidential content includes:

- William Taft

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