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Kentucky Historical Society

CPC Catalog > Organization: Kentucky Historical Society

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Kentucky Historical Society

Martin F. Schmidt Research Library

100 West Broadway

Frankfort, KY 40601

http://history.ky.gov/

Description:

The Martin F. Schmidt Research Library is Kentucky's premiere genealogical research library. Special Collections manages five collection programs including manuscripts, maps, oral history, photographs and rare books. These collections document most of the major issues in the commonwealth’s past, as well as the day-to-day lives of Kentuckians.

Categories: Zachary Taylor, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant,

Collections:
Thomas Metcalfe letters, 1824-1852.
Metcalfe collection, 1706-1958
Todd collection, 1835-1909
Andrew Johnson. Waller Overton pardon, 1865
[Ulysses S. Grant]. Presidential pardons, 1865-1878.
Calvin Coolidge notes from speech, 1924
Captured Civil War Battle Flags Correspondence, 1905

Note that this is an incomplete collections list. Please contact the organization directly for the most current information about their holdings.


Thomas Metcalfe letters, 1824-1852.

7 items.
Access at KHS only.
This collection consists of seven letters written to Thomas Metcalfe of Kentucky between 1824 and 1852. Letters were written by John C. Breckinridge, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Henry Clay, Jr., John J. Crittenden, and Zachary Taylor. Of particular interest are the letters of Breckinridge, Crittenden, and Clay. The Clay letter, dated Sept. 9, 1831, concerns the congressional elections and presidential nominations. He mentions the Republicans and the Anti-Masonic party. Crittenden's letter, dated Jan. 8, 1849, discusses the "sectional meetings," chaired by Metcalfe, of the slaveholding states. Crittenden considers them "dangerous," but has confidence that Metcalfe will not let anything get out of hand. Breckinridge's 1852 letter is a defensive response to earlier correspondence from Metcalfe concerning Mr. Robinson's (John F. Robinson of Indiana) comments about Metcalfe. He thought Breckinridge conspired to defame him and called Breckinridge a "liar and scoundrel," the result of which was Breckinridge's decision to sever communications with Metcalfe.
This collection may be protected from unauthorized copying by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code).
Thomas Metcalfe, born March 10, 1780, was governor of Kentucky from 1828-1832. Before serving as governor, he was a Kentucky representative and a U.S. representative. In the 1820's, he joined the John Quincy Adams-Henry Clay political faction which became known as the National Republicans. After serving as governor, Metcalfe served as state senator (1834-38) and then held a brief term (June 1848-March 1849) in the U.S. Senate, where he denounced secession. In 1848, he campaigned on behalf of Zachary Taylor in his bid for the presidency. His argument with John Cabell Breckinridge stemmed from Free-Soil speeches Metcalfe and Breckinridge's opponent for a U.S. House seat, Robert Perkins Letcher, made while campaigning in Indiana for Taylor. A friend of Breckinridge, John F. Robinson, had the speeches printed in Kentucky papers just as the race between Letcher and Breckinridge gathered steam. Metcalfe lived the rest of his life at his Nicholas County farm, Forest Retreat, where he died of cholera in 1855.
 

 

http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/39086430

Size
7 items

Presidential content includes:

- Zachary Taylor

[ TOP ↑ ]

Metcalfe collection, 1706-1958

.6 cubic ft.
Condition of material: fair.
This collection contains papers and other materials relating to Governor Thomas Metcalfe and his family. One part of the collection is the Cannon accession. This portion of the papers and other materials were donated by Mrs. Betty Cannon of Albany, Georgia, a member of the Metcalfe family, and generally concerns Thomas Metcalfe. This subgroup contains several letters to Thomas Metcalfe from notable figures, genealogical material, and some photographs. Included are two 1831 letters from Henry Clay, one merely a letter of introduction, the other covering politics relating to the masonry and anti-masonry parties. Also present is an 1824 letter signed by John C. Calhoun as secretary of war concerning a pension claim for a Metcalfe constituent, and a letter written by Zachary Taylor during his 1848 campaign for the presidency. There is also correspondence between Metcalfe and John C. Breckinridge concerning an apparent misrepresentation of Metcalfe's stand on slavery by an unamed friend of Breckinridge. An 1849 letter from John J. Crittenden is also present, congratulating Metcalfe on winning election to the United States Senate.
The Cannon subgroup also contains a typed genealogy and coat of arms for the Metcalfe family, and a pamphlet on Metcalfe genealogy published in 1903. A genealogy for the Ball family is present as well. Photographs in the subgroup include undated images of Thomas Metcalfe and his son, Colonel Leonidas Metcalfe. A copy of the photograph of Abraham Lincoln (ca. 1860s), as well as an image of an unidentified girl are also present.
The other part of the collection is the Thompson-Dewinkler accession. These papers belonged to Virginia Dewinkler, a descendant of Governor Metcalfe. This subgroup contains materials pertaining to three or more generations of the Metcalfe family.
Included are land documents and other official papers concerning John Metcalfe, Thomas Metcalfe's father; a few items of political significance relating to Thomas Metcalfe; and papers relating to the military career of Leonidas Metcalfe, son of the governor. The Leonidas Metcalfe materials include correspondence with information about his service in the Mexican-American War and Civil War era letters.
An unusual Civil War item in the collection is a handwritten letter, dated August 23, 1862, by Confederate Commander J. [John] S. Scott to an unnamed commander on the Union side, demanding the unconditional surrender of Richmond, Kentucky.
Biographical note: Thomas Metcalfe was a native of Virginia. His family moved to Fayette County, Kentucky in 1804 and later settled in Nicholas County. Thomas became a stonemason and acquired the nickname "Stonehammer". He and his wife, Nancy Mason Metcalfe, whom he married about 1806, had four children.
He began his public service as a member of the Kentucky General Assembly. During his term, he served in the War of 1812 as a captain of volunteers. In 1819 Metcalfe was elected to the United States Congress. He remained in the House of Representatives until his election as governor in 1828. Metcalfe was the first gubernatorial candidate in Kentucky to be nominated by party convention instead of the previous caucus system, and he ran on the national republican ticket. Internal improvements such as roads, canals, and railroads dominated his agenda while in office. After his term as governor, Metcalfe served as a state senator and United States Senator. He died of cholera in 1855.
Catalog card.
Bell, Mary Margaret. MANUSCRIPTS OF THE KENTUCKY HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1993.
 

 

http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/191917576

Size
.6 cubic feet

Presidential content includes:

- Zachary Taylor

[ TOP ↑ ]

Todd collection, 1835-1909

1.95 cubic ft.
Condition of material: fair.
These are the papers of Harry Innes Todd and his son, George Davidson Todd. The first part of the collection consists of the correspondence of Harry Innes Todd. These letters primarily concern business and politics. There are family letters from the Todd and Crittenden families. Included is a letter from General Thomas Leonidas Crittenden describing his command in the Arizona Territory in 1867. Some early political letters concern the prospects of Todd and the writers gaining influence in the new administration of Zachary Taylor since they had been loyal Whigs and supporters of Taylor. Todd's later participation in republican politics is demonstrated by an 1879 letter from United States Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan discussing Republican presidential possibilities for 1880 (specifically the talk of nominating former President Ulysses S. Grant and Harlan's feeling that Grant could not overcome the tradition against the third term.).
The second part of the collection relates to George Davidson Todd's life, mayoral bid, his position with the Hardware Jobbers' Union, and social engagements. Also included is a photograph of the U.S.S. Wilmington commanded by George Todd's brother, Commander Chapman C. Todd. The Wilmington, with Todd in command, later saw battle in the Spanish-American War.
There are also seven scrapbooks. These primarily relate to politics, specifically Todd's brief tenure as mayor, his unsuccessful bid in 1897 to win a full term, and his campaign in 1909 as the candidate of an independent, reform party, which was also unsuccessful. The scrapbooks contain clippings, social invitations and programs, and some correspondence.
 

 

http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/191917566

Size
1.95 cubic foot

Presidential content includes:

- Zachary Taylor

[ TOP ↑ ]

Andrew Johnson. Waller Overton pardon, 1865

1 FF1 folder.
Pardon for Waller Overton from President Andrew Johnson and signed by Secretary of State William H. Seward, dated 31 July 1865. The pardon is contingent upon Waller taking the oath of allegiance to the United States and could be voided if he was ever found to own slaves.
Copyrights have not been dedicated to the public. Consideration of the requirements of copyright is the responsibility of the author and publisher.
 

Size
1 folder

Presidential content includes:

- Andrew Johnson

[ TOP ↑ ]

[Ulysses S. Grant]. Presidential pardons, 1865-1878.

31 items.
Access at KHS only.
This collection consists of thirty-one presidential pardons, dated 1865-1878, for Kentuckians convicted of federal crimes. The documents are signed by Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Rutherford B. Hayes. Names of those pardoned are J.H.D. McKee, Elias J. Anderson, Leander Adams, R.J. Beaumont, Joseph Bloomgart, Joseph Burke, Jacob Carver, Henry C. Chappell, Thomas Cole, J.P. Earven, Thomas Jackson, John R. Gorley, John G. Kusterer, James H. Kellogg, William Lacy, William Leger, Thomas W. Lendrum, Charles McGarrigle, John B. Martin, W.J. New, James Settle, John Overton, John Rhodes, John Stuart, Thomas Vickers, John Rivers, William Roman, M. Walter Scott, W.F. Smoot, Simon Margolyes, David Cox, William E. Stout, Oscar Van Stein, William Williams, and George Williams.
Available on microfilm, Clift no. 730; Original fragile, use microfilm copy.
This collection may be protected from unauthorized copying by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code).
Finding aids Available in Special Collections; Folder level control.
ArchiveGrid: http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/39086325

Size
31 items

Presidential content includes:

- Ulysses S. Grant

[ TOP ↑ ]

Calvin Coolidge notes from speech, 1924

Coolidge, Calvin, 1872-1933. This collection consists of possible transcription for autograph purposes of part of a speech given by Coolidge in a commencement address for Wheaton College, Norton, Massachusetts, in 1921. The contents of the statement concern the need for spirtual and cultural development rather than material development.

 

http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/37458524

Size
1 folder

Presidential content includes:

- Calvin Coolidge

[ TOP ↑ ]

Captured Civil War Battle Flags Correspondence, 1905

Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930. This collection consists of letters, dated 1905, from U.S. Secretary of War, William Howard Taft, and Acting Secretary of War, Robert Shaw Oliver, to Gov. J.C.W. Beckham of Kentucky. The letters concern the return of captured Civil War battle flags to Kentucky. Included with Oliver's letter was a booklet listing all captured battle flags in the U.S.

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/905608749

Size
1 folder

Presidential content includes:

- William Taft

[ TOP ↑ ]