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University of South Carolina

CPC Catalog > Organization: University of South Carolina

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South Caroliniana Library
910 Sumter St.
University of South Carolina
Columbia, S.C. 29208

Description:

The South Caroliniana Library is only one of the Special Collections of the University Librariesat the University of South Carolina.

http://library.sc.edu/socar/about.html

Categories: John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Rutherford B. Hayes,

Collections:
Mary M. Powell to John Tyler, 22 January 1842
E. A. Green to Frances M. Aborn, Bridgewater, Mass., 24 September 1841
John Bachman to Henry Summer, 6 September 1851
Presidential proclamation, 10 September 1867
Oliver Wendell Holmes to Paul Hamilton Hayne, 11 April 1877
John Temple Graves Papers, 1840-1925
Palmetto Club to Grover Cleveland, 18 March 1907

Note that this is an incomplete collections list. Please contact the organization directly for the most current information about their holdings.


Mary M. Powell to John Tyler, 22 January 1842

1 item.
Letter, 22 Jan. 1842, from a woman residing in upstate South Carolina, in which she urges President John Tyler to prevent any efforts by the current U.S. Congress to repeal recent legislation that allowed individuals to declare bankruptcy.
Mrs. Powell apologizes for what might be viewed as her forwardness in writing to the President, especially since "I am aware that it is out of the sphere of Women to interfere in politics," but appeals to him for his support of the bankruptcy laws enacted by Congress the previous year and asks that he exercise his power to veto any action of the new Congress that threatened to repeal the legislation.
Noting that such laws were "of vital importance not only to myself and my i[n]nocent & helpless children but to thousands of others similarly situated," the writer alludes to the indebtedness of her husband, "a sober, Industrious, and enterprizing Man," whose indebtedness had placed her family at the mercy of creditors. When he was imprisoned for debt, "the Sheriff entered my mansion and sold my cooking utensils while on the fire with the viands in them.".
In upholding the laws, the letter suggests, President Tyler would be hailed as "the messenger of mercy to thousand[s] who have been ground to dust by merciless creditors & their agents"; in a postscript, Mrs. Powell requests that the letter be forwarded to [James Gordon] Bennett of the New York Herald.
This letter reflects recent legislation of the day; the U.S. Congress enacted the first set of standard bankruptcy laws in the United States in Aug. 1841, which allowed citizens the right to voluntarily declare for bankruptcy. President John Tyler used the presidential veto ten times on a variety of legislation during his administration.
Mary M. Powell to President John Tyler, 22 Jan. 1842, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/230735812

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- John Tyler

[ TOP ↑ ]

E. A. Green to Frances M. Aborn, Bridgewater, Mass., 24 September 1841

1 item.
Letter informing Miss Aborn of his appraisal of Attorney General Hugh Swinton Legare and other men in the cabinet of President John Tyler.
E.A. Green to Frances M. Aborn, 24 Sept. 1841, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.

http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/36800286
 

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- John Tyler

[ TOP ↑ ]

John Bachman to Henry Summer, 6 September 1851

1 item.
University South Caroliniana Society Program, 1996, pp. pp. 28-29.
Letter discussing issues of secession and the Compromise of 1850 and describing a trip to the North during which Bachman spoke with President Millard Fillmore.
Bachman replies to Summer, "You are right in supposing that I am disposed to keep aloof from politics... it is unsuited to my profession & the general tenour of my thoughts & studies. I however do not conceal my sentiments & when asked I express them without reserve. I do not go for the compromise or for submission under it. My views do not materially differ from those of McDonald, Quitman, Butler Soule Davis &c- I am opposed to separate state secession, but in favour of agitation, uniting the south - biding our time, & then if we do not receive justice in the Union, we can secure it out of it.".
John Bachman to Henry Summer, 6 Sept. 1851, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/191078045

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- Millard Fillmore

[ TOP ↑ ]

Presidential proclamation, 10 September 1867

1 item (broadside)
University South Caroliniana Society Program, 1984, p. 21.
Broadside declaring that "impediments and obstructions" in North and South Carolina "[are] hindering and preventing ... a proper enforcement ... of the laws of the United States" and its courts and warning that such actions must cease and that the military would assist "in administering the laws and carrying out actions of the courts.".
Andrew Johnson, Presidential Proclamation, 10 Sept. 1867, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/30698063

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- Andrew Johnson

[ TOP ↑ ]

Oliver Wendell Holmes to Paul Hamilton Hayne, 11 April 1877

1 item.
Filed as part of Paul Hamilton Hayne papers (folder 7).
University South Caroliniana Society Program, 1993, p. 41.
Letter from Holmes in which the Boston poet responds sympathetically to poems, "South Carolina" and "Vision," sent him by Hayne and comments on the trials of Reconstruction endured by South Carolina, and expresses belief that President Rutherford B. Hayes would improve the conditions discussed in Hayne's poems.
Oliver Wendell Holmes to Paul Hamilton Hayne, 11 Apr. 1877, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.
http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/31444826

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- Rutherford B. Hayes

[ TOP ↑ ]

John Temple Graves Papers, 1840-1925

Graves, John Temple, 1856-1925. Journalist and lecturer; father of journalist John Temple Graves (1892-1961), and descendent of William Calhoun; educated in Greenville, S.C., and the University of Georgia; associated with newspapers in Florida, Georgia., New York, and Washington, D.C., from 1882-1925. Born in Willington Church, Abbeville District, S.C. [now in McCormick County, S.C.]. Family letters, scrapbooks and papers connected with Graves' career as a journalist and lecturer in Abbeville District (S.C.), Georgia, and Washington D.C. Twenty-six letters, 1840-1869, contain family correspondence of the Graves, Townes and deGraffenried families of S.C., Georgia, and Mississippi; includes: school letters from Graves to his grandmother, Lucretia Calhoun Townes deGraffenried; a letter from Graves' father, James Porterfield Graves, 18 July 1869, requesting a copy of "Burkes Weekly containing a contribution from you.". Letters, 1884-1923, from various governors, congressmen, cabinet officials and presidents: including Martin F. Ansel, William E. Borah, George E. Chamberlain, Champ Clark, Grover Cleveland, Warren G. Harding, William McAdoo, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, Hoke Smith, William H. Taft, and Woodrow Wilson.  Also contains information on Graves as a speaker for the Democratic Party in 1920 and his work on the Commission for the Lincoln Memorial. Newspaper articles, 1881-1925 (1161 clippings), document Graves' career as journalist and lecturer (on microfilm R.212). 

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/738407127

Size
297 items

Presidential content includes:

- Grover Cleveland

- Warren G. Harding

- William McKinley

- Theodore Roosevelt

- Woodrow Wilson

- William Taft

[ TOP ↑ ]

Palmetto Club to Grover Cleveland, 18 March 1907

Palmetto Club (Georgetown, S.C.) Letter to Hon. Grover Cleveland (South Island, South Carolina), March 18, 1907. Letter from a local social organization honoring Cleveland on his birthday, during his stay on an island elsewhere in Georgetown County, S.C. Typewritten letter on Palmetto Club letterhead, signed by J.I. Hazard, president, extending best wishes to Grover Cleveland on his [seventieth] birthday, fondly recalling his visit to Georgetown, and noting that the "services rendered by you in the high office to which you were twice called by the suffrages of your fellow country-men" contributed to the public perception that 'public office is a public trust'" and that Cleveland's retirement from official life "has not lessened the influence exerted by you upon the political character and ideals of our people.".

 

https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/650561834

Size
1 item

Presidential content includes:

- Grover Cleveland

[ TOP ↑ ]