Miller Center

Evan McCormick

Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia

"Between Revolution and Repression: U.S. Foreign Policy and Latin American Democracy, 1980-1989"

McCormick photo

Evan D. McCormick is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

He joined the CPH in August 2015. Evan's research focuses on the history of U.S.-Latin American relations during the Cold War, with a focus on the intersection of U.S. development policies, Latin American democracy, and human rights. Evan is currently expanding his research and writing interests in presidential and public history through involvement in the CPH's Collective Memory Project, an oral history program that focuses on specific aspects of the administration of George W. Bush.

Before joining SMU, Evan was a dissertation fellow at the Miller Center and an Eisenhower/Roberts Fellow of the Eisenhower Institute at Gettysburg College. He was the recipient of the University of Virginia's Albert Gallatin Graduate Research Fellowship and a junior fellow in the University of Virginia Society of Fellows. 

Evan received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 2015.

His dissertation, “Beyond Revolution and Repression: U.S. Foreign Policy and Latin American Democracy, 1980-1989,” explored the history of U.S. efforts to promote democracy amidst Latin American civil conflicts during the Reagan years. Evan earned an M.A. in international relations from Yale University (2007) and a B.A. in international relations from Boston University (2003).  Before returning to academia, he served as a policy analyst at the Department of Homeland Security where he specialized in U.S.-Latin American security issues. His work has appeared in The Journal of Cold War Studies.

Fellowship year: 2015

Mentor: Gilbert Joseph, Yale University

Selected Recent Publications

"Freedom Tide? Ideology, Politics, and the Origins of Democracy Promotion in U.S. Central America Policy, 1980–1984." Journal of Cold War Studies 16, no. 4 (Fall 2014)

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