Miller Center

Kyle M. Lascurettes

Politics, University of Virginia

Orders of Exclusion: The Strategic Sources of International Orders and Great Power Ordering

Lascurettes photo

Kyle Lascurettes is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at Lewis & Clark College.

Lascurettes received his Ph.D. from the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia in 2012.  His research is in the areas of international security and international organization, and his interests include the strategic use of ideas in international relations, psychology and world politics, the intersection of trade and interstate conflict, and how states and statesmen learn from history in global affairs.

Lascurettes' dissertation was awarded the American Political Science Association Kenneth N. Waltz Prize for best dissertation in the field of international security and arms control.  The project sought to explain the preferences of great powers for establishing or reestablishing order in the international system, here defined as a set of established, foundational rules accepted by a significant number of important actors at a given time. He argues that powerful states most often advocate visions of order that will weaken or discredit the entity they find most threatening to their preferred vision of order, be it another powerful state, an ideological movement or a transnational network. If successful, they are thus able to create an order premised on weakening, opposing and above all excluding this threat from reaping the benefits of stable international order. The project is macro-historical in scope and analyzes a broad set of cases to elucidate general patterns of preferences for order from the advent of the modern state system through the American Century to the present.

Fellowship year: 2011

Mentor: John Ikenberry, Princeton University

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