Miller Center

Simon Stevens

History, Columbia University

“Strategies of Struggle: International Pressure and the End of Apartheid, 1958-1994”

Stevens photo

Simon Stevens is the Max Webber Post-doctoral Fellow in History at the European University Institute, St. John's College at the University of Cambridge.  He carried out his PhD research in the Department of History at Columbia University in New York. Previously he received his BA and MPhil in History from the University of Cambridge. Stevens was a Choate Memorial Fellow at Harvard University, and held pre-doctoral fellowships at the Center for the US and the Cold War at New York University in addition to his Miller Center National Fellowship.

Stevens will submit hisdissertation in August 2015. Entitled ‘Strategies of Struggle: Boycotts, Sanctions, and the War Against Apartheid,’ his project analyzes the role in the strategy and tactics of the global anti-apartheid movement of campaigns for consumer, sports, and cultural boycotts, governmental trade sanctions, and corporate disinvestment.  He explores the multiple shifts in how the core constituents of the anti-apartheid movement believed apartheid might be ended, and how various forms of international action might best contribute to that end.

Stevens' research interests include transnational activism and activist movements, African political and diplomatic history, American foreign relations, Britain's post-imperial international relations, decolonization, the Cold War, internationalisms, human rights, and humanitarianism. While a doctoral candidate Stevens serves as a Teaching Fellow on courses in international, African, and American history.

Simon's publications include "'From the Viewpoint of a Southern Governor': The Carter Administration and Apartheid, 1977-1981" in Diplomatic History (2012), and  "Why South Africa? The Politics of Anti-Apartheid Activism in Britain in the Long 1970s" in The Breakthrough: Human Rights in the 1970s, edited by Jan Eckel and Samuel Moyn (Pennsylvania University Press, 2014). He has presented papers in venues including the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations annual meeting, the Ghana Studies Association conference, the Center for the United States and the Cold  War Seminar at New York University, the Department of Historical Studies Seminar at the University of Cape Town, and the Cold War Research Seminar at the London School of Economics.

Fellowship year: 2015

Mentor: Saul Dubow, Queen Mary University

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