Miller Center

Miller Center National Fellowship

Beginning in the 2017-2018 academic year, the National Fellowship Program, a longstanding initiative of the Miller Center, will fall under the leadership of the Jefferson Scholars Foundation at U.Va.. The Jefferson Scholars Foundation, created in 1980, currently offers the premier graduate fellowship and undergraduate scholarship at the University. To learn more about the National Fellows Program, including how to apply, click here.

Meet The Fellows

Emily Charnock - Political Science, University of Virginia

Project: From Ghosts to Shadows: The National Party Organizations and Interest Groups

Charnock photo

Emily Charnock is the Keasbey Research Fellow in American Studies at Selwyn College at the University of Cambridge.

In her dissertation, “From Ghosts to Shadows: The National Party Organizations and Interest Groups,” Charnock explores the institutional impact of the relationship between key interest groups and the parties with which they have traditionally been allied. Her project promises to inform our current debate about the way interest groups like the Tea Party or labor can drive the political debate and party’s agendas. Charnock has published a co-authored piece in Political Science Quarterly.

Selected Recent Publications

"The Second Emancipation Proclamation." Virginia Quarterly Review, August 28, 2013.

"What happened to post-partisanship? Barack Obama and the New American Party System." with Sidney M. Milkis, Perspectives on Politics 10, no. 1 (2012): 57-76.

"What to Expect in the Second Term: Presidential Travel and the Rise of Legacy Building, 1957-2009." with James A. McCann and Dunn Tenpas, Brookings Institute: Issues in Governance Studies 54 (December 2012)


Daniel Galvin - Political Science, Yale University

Project: Presidential Party Building in the United States

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Daniel Galvin is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of Undergraduate Studies at Northwestern University.

His research focuses on the development of political institutions, political organizations, and public policy in the United States. He is the author of Presidential Party Building: Dwight D. Eisenhower to George W. Bush (Princeton University Press, 2010), numerous scholarly articles and book chapters, and coeditor of Rethinking Political Institutions: the Art of the State (NYU Press, 2006). His current research examines the effects of organized labor’s decline on public policy, party politics, and the working poor.

Galvin has won the “Emerging Scholar Award” from the American Political Science Association’s Political Organizations and Parties section, the E. LeRoy Hall Award for Excellence in Teaching from Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern, the R. Barry Farrell Teaching Award from the Department of Political Science, and was twice elected by the Northwestern student body to the Faculty Honor Roll. He currently serves as the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Political Science department and is affiliated with the Comparative-Historical Social Science program. He is a co-coordinator of the interdisciplinary Political Parties Working Group and the American Politics Workshop.

Galvin's dissertation examined the actions undertaken by presidents to change their parties, and finds that at best only half the story is in view. The aim of his dissertation was to demonstrate the fact that some modern presidents have acted more constructively with regard to their parties than others, to consider why this might be so, and to bring presidential party building into view as a component of modern American political development whose significance and variability is clearly evident in politics today.

Selected Recent Publications

Presidential Party Building: Dwight D. Eisenhower to George W. Bush, Princeton University Press (2010).

"Wage Theft, Public Policy, and the Politics of Workers' Rights," Institute for Policy Research Working Paper Series WP-15-08 (2015). 
"Qualitative Methods and American Political Development" in The Oxford Handbook of American Political Development, Richard Valelly, Suzanne Mettler, and Robert Lieberman, eds. (2015).

"Presidents as Agents of ChangePresidential Studies Quarterly 44, no. 1 (March 2014).


Katherine Krimmel - Politics, Princeton University

Project: Special Interest Partisanship: The Transformation of American Political Parties

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Fellowship year: 2013

Mentor: Nolan McCarty, Princeton University

Katherine Krimmel is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Barnard College.

Krimmel specializes in American Politics where her research analyzes democratic representation in the United States from several angles.  Her book project, Picking Sides: Group-Party Linkages in Postwar America, analyzes changes in the relationship between political parties and special interest groups since the New Deal.  She also have two other projects examining the relationship between public opinion and different political outcomes.  The first, co-authored with Jeffrey Lax and Justin Phillips, analyzes opinion and representation on gay rights issues.  The second, co-authored with Kelly Rader, investigates why the states most opposed to federal spending tend to receive disproportionately large amounts of federal money.

Selected Recent Publications

"Gay Rights in Congress: Public Opinion and (Mis)Representation." Public Opinion Quarterly (August 20, 2014)


Nicole Mellow - Political Science, University of Texas, Austin

Project: Rising Partisanship: A Study of the Regional Dimensions of Conflict in the Post-War House of Representatives

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Nicole Mellow is Associate Professor of Political Science at Williams College.

Her research interests are in American political development and she is currently at work on a book entitled Legacies of Loss in American Politics with Jeffrey Tulis (Princeton, forthcoming). She is also working on a project on national identity and state building at the beginning of the twentieth century, tentatively titled, How White Ethnics Got Themselves a New Deal: Nation Building and the Interventionist State, 1900 to 1940

Mellow's dissertation, "Rising Partisanship: A Study of the Regional Dimensions of Conflict in the Post-War House of Representatives," studied American political parties in the post-World War II era. She argued that the resurgence of congressional party conflict in recent decades after years of decreasing conflict, and the rise in partisanship since the 1970s, was in part the result of a regional restructuring of the party system, one in which the geographical bases of the two major parties shifted. Tensions within the New Deal party system contributed to the development of new regional orientations within the parties and this led to greater conflict between them. Mellow's research combined aggregate data analysis with historical case studies of conflict in the policy areas of trade, welfare, and abortion.

Selected Recent Publications

The State of Disunion: Regional Sources of Modern American Partisanship (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

The Anti-Federal Appropriation.” with Jeffrey Tulis, American Political Thought 3, no. 1 (Spring 2014).

How the Democrats Rejuvenated Their Coalition.” in Michael Nelson, ed., The Elections of 2012 (Washington D.C.: CQ Press, 2013).

Foreign Policy, Bipartisanship, and the Paradox of Post-September 11 America.” with Peter Trubowitz, International Politics 48, no.2-3 (2011): 164-187.


Emily Pears - Politics, University of Virginia

Project: “Chords of Sympathy: The Development of National Political Attachments in the 19th Century”

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Emily Pears is an Assistant Professor of Government at Claremont McKenna College.

Her research is in the areas of 19th-century U.S. federalism, American political development, American nationalism and U.S. state building. Emily received her B.A. in Government from Claremont McKenna College and M.A in American Politics from the University of Virginia. She previously worked as a policy advocate for voting rights and redistricting reform issues in San Francisco and Sacramento, California.

Emily’s dissertation begins with the question of when and how citizens’ political attachments originally shifted from the state governments to the national government during the 19th century.  Looking specifically at how state building, party organization and cultural homogenization impacted citizens’ differential attachments to their state and national governments, Emily argues that across the United States state legislatures continued to hold public sway well past the civil war period.  While the national state grew significantly during the course of the 19th century, administrative functions at the state and local level remained the most visible to American citizens, allowing and encouraging them to maintain strong attachments to their state governments.  Party building in the 1830’s and 1840’s created an organizational structure that allowed individuals to connect their local activities to national political causes.


Robert Saldin - Politics, University of Virginia

Project: War and American Political Development: Parties, State Building, and Democratic Rights Policy

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Robert Saldin is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Montana, the Director of the Project on American Democracy and Citizenship, and a Fellow in Ethics and Public Affairs at the Mansfield Center.

Saldin's dissertation examined how wars affect American politics from the outside in and argued that they provide an explanatory framework that ties American state development, policy making, elections, and political parties together. In contrast to much of the existing American Political Development and Realignment literature, which focus solely on domestic factors, Saldin's project argued that wars affect American politics in several ways. He discussed how a greater appreciation of war's domestic impact offers guidance in understanding current domestic and international events.

Selected Recent Publications

War, the American State, and Politics Since 1898 (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

"What War's Good For: Minority Rights Expansions in American Political Development." in New Directions in American Politics, ed. Raymond La Raja (Routledge, 2013).

"William McKinley and the Rhetorical Presidency." Presidential Studies Quarterly 41, no. 1 (2011).


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